Interested in getting into TT racing. What do I need to know...

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ridingred

Active Member
Apr 12, 2012
#2
lowering kit first and foremost, then you will need some tires. I do a few local races a year and the lowering kit and tires is good enough for me to have fun. When you start getting real competitive you can get sway bars and some suspension work.
 

bigcountrydude

Lifetime Member
Apr 10, 2012
#5
flea bay for lowering kit. tires for TT is outside my knowledge. except i think most ppl run a 10in rim. and depends on how serious you get...
 

ridingred

Active Member
Apr 12, 2012
#6
you don't need new shocks to start racing flat track. just get the lowering kit, i got mine on ebay, for like 100 bucks or so for the front and rear. If you are getting to be good and competitive you can invest in some built shocks and then also get a shorter swingarm. Otherwise, for starting out all ya need is tires and the lowering kit.
 
Likes: Scandall519

bigcountrydude

Lifetime Member
Apr 10, 2012
#10
i'd say don't bother unless you get a sway bar. same as ice-racing. and a used one can be had for 200 and less. and worth its weight in gold at the track.
 

Josh72

Active Member
May 13, 2012
#11
Depending on track conditions and and the size of track, you will need different tires.
10" rims all around. Less tire roll.
If you already have long travel arms, you could just put your stock shocks on to lower it.
Make sure your rear end is soft so your weight can transfer to the rear tires for traction instead of just spinning.
If the track you are racing on is very loose and dirt like, you will want very soft compound hoosiers, they will hook up much better.
You do not want to be spinning your tires in the corners, I've learned this. Use your clutch if you have to to keep them from spinning, once your tires brake loose, you might as well move over and let the guys pass.
Most tracks will not require hoosier style front tires, but trust me, if you have them, they will pull you right through the corners. knobby tires have much less surface area contacting the surface of the track so they will just want to slide and if they slide, then you will want to slide your rear end around to correct for it. Once you start sliding out, you will spin before you know it. If you are really unlucky, the rears will hook up when your sideways and you'll flip. I have learned that too :p lol
Anything else, just ask!
 
Likes: Scandall519

Baileyguns

Staff member
Apr 28, 2012
#12
Depending on track conditions and and the size of track, you will need different tires.
10" rims all around. Less tire roll.
If you already have long travel arms, you could just put your stock shocks on to lower it.
Make sure your rear end is soft so your weight can transfer to the rear tires for traction instead of just spinning.
If the track you are racing on is very loose and dirt like, you will want very soft compound hoosiers, they will hook up much better.
You do not want to be spinning your tires in the corners, I've learned this. Use your clutch if you have to to keep them from spinning, once your tires brake loose, you might as well move over and let the guys pass.
Most tracks will not require hoosier style front tires, but trust me, if you have them, they will pull you right through the corners. knobby tires have much less surface area contacting the surface of the track so they will just want to slide and if they slide, then you will want to slide your rear end around to correct for it. Once you start sliding out, you will spin before you know it. If you are really unlucky, the rears will hook up when your sideways and you'll flip. I have learned that too :p lol
Anything else, just ask!
Hey Josh, whats the deal with those eBay front lowering links? Will they work on aftermarket arms too or just stock arms?

Glad you found the site!
 

Josh72

Active Member
May 13, 2012
#13
Hey Josh, whats the deal with those eBay front lowering links? Will they work on aftermarket arms too or just stock arms?

Glad you found the site!
I think the reason I found the site has something to do with you sending me the link to it on Facebook. ;) I'm pretty sure anyway. lol
You will have to look at your arms first.
If all of the mounts are the same, then they will not fit the oem ds450 arms because where the shock mounts the inside of the mount does not go straight down to the arm, there is a little curve to it so the square block can not slide down far enough to line up with the bolt holes.
You will have to check out your arms and see if they are like that or not.
 

ridingred

Active Member
Apr 12, 2012
#15
i use the ebay lowering kit for my flat track races. i also run nobbies at the local spots and it's fine. If you're serious and into the AMA flat track then you'll want to get some tires, but for what i do at he local fairs and tracks i can have fun with nobbies and the lowering kit.
 

Baileyguns

Staff member
Apr 28, 2012
#16
They're LSR arms.. The cross bar under the shock mount is a tube. I want something to lower it for the ice next winter. I picked up a swaybar a few weeks ago, I forget if I told you that.
 

Josh72

Active Member
May 13, 2012
#17
Oh nice! put up a picture of them and I'll let you know if i think it would fit!
And yeah its me! I figured it was you too. lol
 

joshyz125

Active Member
Jun 3, 2012
#18
You could go about it Many differant ways, but i would get alot of your suspension stuff first. Sway bar, Maultech TT Rear linkage, Hit up Jet Suspension, he done my TT Suspension, Lowering kits really screw with the suspension, they don't work very well IMO, but i guess it depends on how competitive you want to be. Don't get super offset wheels for the front, that messes with your steering also.
Engine, once again, depends on how competitive you want to be.
The most popular tires around here at either the Hoosier 10 or 12 compound, or the American Racer 30 or 33.
 

Josh72

Active Member
May 13, 2012
#19
I just purchased a set of front hoosiers D12 Compound. $82 and change each. Rears I have been using the Tri-Trac tires and they seem to be good. Not sure on the compound, they are a little harder then the fronts.